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Bond Madison Water Company 2016 Annual Water Quality ReportBond Madison Water Company 2016 Annual Water Quality Report

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2016 Annual Water Quality Report

This report is designed to inform you about the quality water we delivered to you over the past year. If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact our water supply operator, Sandy Kuhn at 618 669-2861 or attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. They are held at 7:00 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the Water Company office, 103 Park Street, Pocahontas.

Bond Madison Water Company purchases your water from Illinois American Water Company. This water is piped from the Granite City Water Treatment Plant which receives water from the Mississippi River. A source water assessment for the Granite City system has been completed by the Illinois EPA and a copy is available upon request by calling Rachel Bretz, Illinois American Water Quality Supervisor at 618-465-6736 ext 4. IEPA considers all surface water sources of community water supply to be susceptible to potential pollution problems, hence, the reason for mandatory treatment for all surface water supplies in Illinois. Mandatory treatment includes coagulation, sedimentation, filtration, and disinfection.

The Granite City distribution system also has an interconnection with the East St. Louis distribution system. Water is routinely supplied to the Granite City system through that connection. To view a summary version of the completed Source Water Assessments you may access the IEPA website at http://www.epa.state.il.us/cgi-bin/wp/swap-fact-sheets.pl.

Bond Madison Water Company routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The first table in this report shows the results of Illinois American’s monitoring for the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2016 at their Granite City supply. Because customers may at times receive water from the East St. Louis supply, the second table contains the monitoring information from that distribution system. The third table includes the system monitoring data for Bond Madison Water Company.

Illinois American Water

Cryptosporidium (East St. Louis & Granite City)

Cryptosporidium is a protozoan found in untreated surface waters throughout the United States (the organism is generally not present in a ground water source). Although filtration removes Cryptosporidium, the most commonly used filtration methods cannot guarantee 100% removal. Ingestion of Cryptosporidium may cause cryptosporidiosis, an abdominal infection. Symptoms of infection include nausea, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps. Most healthy individuals can overcome the disease within a few weeks. However, people with severely weakened immune systems have a risk of developing life-threatening illness. We encourage such people to consult their doctors regarding appropriate precautions to take to avoid infection. Cryptosporidium must be ingested to cause disease, and it is spread through means other than drinking water. USEPA issued a new rule in 2006 that requires systems with higher Cryptosporidium levels in their source water to provide additional treatment. In 2016, our monitoring of the Mississippi River raw untreated water indicated the presence of this organism. The Mississippi River cryptosporidium levels at our Granite City raw water source ranged from not detected to 0.273 oocysts/L, with an average of 0.060 oocysts/L. The Mississippi River cryptosporidium levels at our East St. Louis raw water source ranged from not detected to 0.500 oocysts/L, with an average of 0.089 oocysts/L. Although this organism is present, it is at levels low enough that no supplemental treatment is required by our facility per USEPA standards.

Water Quality Results

Illinois American Water – Granite City

2016 Regulated Substances Detected

The next several tables summarize contaminants detected in your drinking water supply.

 

Inorganic Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Levels Detected

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

 

Fluoride3

2016

0.8

0.78 – 0.78

4

4.0

ppm

No

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

 

Nitrate (measured as Nitrogen) 4

2016

5

4.98 – 4.98

10

10

ppm

No

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

 

Sodium5

2016

17

16.7 -16.7

N/A

N/A

ppm

No

Erosion from naturally occurring deposits: Used in water softener regeneration.

 

3 Fluoride is added to the water supply to help promote strong teeth. The Illinois Department of Public Health recommends a fluoride level of 0.7 mg/L. Highest Level Detected is an annual average.

4 Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants less than 6 months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant you, should ask advice from your health care provider.

5 There is no state or federal MCL for sodium. Monitoring is required to provide information to consumers and health officials that are concerned about sodium intake due to dietary precautions. If you are on a sodium-restricted diet, you should consult a physician about this level of sodium in the water.

 

Radiological Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Levels Detected

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

 

Beta/photon emitters6

2011

15 pCi/L

15-15 pCi/L

0

4

mrem/y

No

Erosion of natural deposits.

 

Gross Alpha emitters

2011

2.9

2.9-2.9

0

15

pCi/L

No

Erosion of natural deposits.

 

6 The MCL for Beta/photon emitters is written as 4 millirem/year (measure of rate of radiation absorbed by the body). Laboratory results are reported in pCi/L as we have on the table above. EPA considers 50 pCi/L as the level of concern for beta emitters.

 

Turbidity

 

 

Limit (Treatment Technique)

Level Detected

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

 

Lowest Monthly % Meeting Limit

0.3 NTU

100%

No

Soil Runoff

 

Highest Single Measurement

1 NTU

0.15 NTU

No

Soil Runoff

 

Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of the water caused by suspended particles. We monitor it because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our filtration system, water quality, and disinfectants. The treatment technique requires that at least 95% of routine samples are less than or equal to 0.3 NTU, and no sample exceeds 1 NTU. We are reporting the percentage of all readings meeting the standard of 0.3 NTU, plus the single highest reading for the year.

 

Total Organic Carbon

The percentage of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal was measured each month and the system met all TOC removal requirements set by IEPA. TOC has no health effects but contributes to the formation of disinfection by-products.  Reduction of TOC can help to minimize disinfection by-product formation.

Note:  The state requires monitoring of certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently.  Therefore, some of this data may be more than one year old.

 

Granite City Advisory Summary

The following violation occurred during 2016.  We included a brief summary of the actions we took following notification.

 

We received a 2016 Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) Advisory for CCR Adequacy/Availability/Content starting July 1, 2016 and ending July 19, 2016.  Due to a computer issue, there were errors in the data tables that were not consistent with IEPA.  The errors were corrected immediately and the CCR was reposted to the website July 19, 2016.  The IEPA acknowledged the corrected report was posted online and that the deficiencies were corrected and the advisory had been returned to compliance.

 

Illinois American Water – East St. Louis

 

2016 Regulated Substances Detected

The next several tables summarize contaminants detected in your drinking water supply.

 

Inorganic Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Levels Detected

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Arsenic

2016

1

1 - 1

0

10

ppb

No

Erosion of natural deposits; runoff from orchards; runoff from glass and electronics production wastes.

Fluoride4

2016

0.8

0.73 – 0.77

4

4.0

ppm

No

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from  fertilizer and aluminum factories.

Nitrate (measured as Nitrogen) 5

2016

5

3.50 – 5.05

10

10

ppm

No

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

Sodium6

2016

16

16 – 16.2

N/A

N/A

ppm

No

Erosion from naturally occurring deposits: Used in water softener regeneration.

4 Fluoride is added to the water supply to help promote strong teeth. The Illinois Department of Public Health recommends a fluoride level of 0.7 mg/L.  Highest Detect is an annual average.

5 Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants less than 6 months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant you, should ask advice from your health care provider.

6 There is no state or federal MCL for sodium. Monitoring is required to provide information to consumers and health officials that are concerned about sodium intake due to dietary precautions. If you are on a sodium-restricted diet, you should consult a physician about this level of sodium in the water.

Radiological Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Level Detected

Range of Levels Detected

MCLG

MCL

Units

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Combined Radium 226/228

2014

0.9

0.9 – 0.9

0

5

pCi/L

No

Erosion of natural deposits.

Beta/photon emitters7

2014

4.4 pCi/L

4.4 – 4.4 pCi/L

0

4

mrem/y

No

Erosion of natural deposits.

Gross Alpha emitters

2014

1.5

1.5 – 1.5

0

15

pCi/L

No

Erosion of natural deposits.

7 The MCL for Beta/photon emitters is written as 4 millirem/year (measure of rate of radiation absorbed by the body). Laboratory results are reported in pCi/L as we have on the table above. EPA considers 50 pCi/L as the level of concern for beta emitters.

Turbidity

 

Limit (Treatment Technique)

Level Detected

Violation

Likely Source of Contamination

Lowest Monthly % Meeting Limit

0.3 NTU

100%

No

Soil Runoff

Highest Single Measurement

1 NTU

0.16 NTU

No

Soil Runoff

Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of the water caused by suspended particles. We monitor it because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our filtration system, water quality, and disinfectants. The treatment technique requires that at least 95% of routine samples are less than or equal to 0.3 NTU, and no sample exceeds 1 NTU. We are reporting the percentage of all readings meeting the standard of 0.3 NTU, plus the single highest reading for the year.

Total Organic Carbon

The percentage of Total Organic Carbon (TOC) removal was measured each month and the system met all TOC removal requirements set by IEPA. TOC has no health effects but contributes to the formation of disinfection by-products.  Reduction of TOC can help to minimize disinfection by-product formation.

Note: The state requires monitoring of certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Therefore, some of this data may be more than one year old.

 

East St. Louis Advisory Summary

The following violation occurred during 2016.  We included a brief summary of the actions we took following notification.

 

We received a 2016 Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) Advisory for CCR Adequacy/Availability/Content starting July 1, 2016 and ending July 19, 2016.  Due to a computer issue, there were errors in the data tables that were not consistent with IEPA.  The errors were corrected immediately and the CCR was reposted to the website July 19, 2016.  The IEPA acknowledged the corrected report was posted online and that the deficiencies were corrected and the advisory had been returned to compliance.

BOND MADISON WATER QUALITY REPORT

 Regulated Substances

Substance  (units)

Date Sampled

MCLG

 

Action Level AL

90th

Percentile

# Sites over AL

Compliance Achieved

Typical Source

 

Copper (ppm)

2015

1.3

1.3

0.318

0

Yes

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives

 

Lead - If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. We cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline 800-426-4791 or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

Disinfection/Disinfectant By-Products

 

Substance (units)

Date Sampled

MCLG

MCL

Highest Level Detected

Range of Detections

Compliance Achieved

Typical Source

 

HAAS-Total Haloacetic Acids (ppb)

2016

N/A

60

21

16 – 29.6

Yes

By-product of drinking water chlorination

 

TTHM-Total trihalomethanes (ppb)

2016

N/A

80

41

19.2– 51.3

Yes

By-product of drinking water chlorination

 

Chloramines (ppm)*

2016

MRDLG=4

MRDL=4

2

1.5 – 2

Yes

Water additive used to control microbes

* Chlorine and chloramines are disinfecting agents added to control microbes that otherwise could cause waterborne diseases or other water quality concerns. Most water systems in Illinois are required by law to add either chlorine or chloramines. Levels well in excess of the MRDL could cause irritation of the eyes or nose in some people. The values reported reflect multiple locations in the service area.  Chloramines are a disinfectant made from combining chlorine and ammonia.

Table Definitions and Abbreviations

  • Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow. · Compliance Achieved: Indicates that the levels found were all within the allowable levels as determined by the USEPA. · Highest Level Detected: In most cases this column is the highest detected level unless compliance is calculated on a Running Annual Average or Locational Running Annual Average. If multiple entry points exist, the data from the entry point with the highest value is reported. · MCL (Maximum Contaminant Level): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. · MCLG (Maximum Contaminant Level Goal): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. · MRDL (Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level): The highest level of disinfectant routinely allowed in drinking water. Addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. · MRDLG (Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal): The level of drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contamination. · NA: Not applicable · ND: Not detectable at testing limits · pCi/L (picocuries per liter): Measurement of the natural rate of disintegration of radioactive contaminants in water (also beta particles). · ppm (parts per million): One part substance per million parts water, or milligrams per liter. · ppb (parts per billion): One part substance per billion parts water, or micrograms per liter. · Range Of Detections: The range of individual sample results, from lowest to highest, that were collected during the sample period. · S: Single sample

As you can see by the table there were no violations. Your drinking water meets or exceeds all Federal and State requirements.  “All sources of drinking water are subject to potential contamination by contaminants that are naturally occurring or are manmade. Those contaminants can be microbes, organic or inorganic chemicals, or radioactive materials.” All drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.      

MCLs are set at very stringent levels. To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated contaminants, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect.  Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline.

What is Thermal Expansion?

When water is heated it expands. For example, water heated from 90?F (32?C) to a thermostat setting of 140?F (60?C) in a 40 gallon hot water heater will expand by almost one-half gallon. This is because when water is heated, its density decreases and its volume expands. Since water is not compressible, the extra volume created by expansion must go someplace. During no-flow periods in a system, pressure reducing valves, backflow preventers, and other one-way valves are closed, thus eliminating a path for expanded water to flow back to the system supply. Hence, system pressure increases.

Thermal expansion of water in a closed plumbing system can create a number of annoying and potentially dangerous problems. These include: the build up of unusually high pressure in a system (even when a pressure reducing valve is installed); pressure surges; and the chronic or continuous dripping of a temperature and pressure relief valve. In addition, dripping faucets and leaking toilet tank ball cock fill valves are also symptomatic of thermal expansion.

More serious problems can also occur due to thermal expansion. When dangerous pressures are built up in a water heater, internal parts may fail such as the internal flues, fittings or water connections. If a flue way collapses it can lead to the potential release of toxic gases, such as carbon monoxide into living spaces. Thermal expansion can also lead to a ruptured or distorted hot water heating tank and may void the manufacturer?s warranty.

Plumbing Code Requirements

Plumbing codes require that thermal expansion control be addressed in plumbing systems. A temperature and pressure relief valve is not considered a thermal expansion device. This is because when water is allowed to continuously drip from the temperature and pressure relief valve, minerals from the water can build up on the valve, eventually blocking it. This blockage can render the temperature and pressure valve useless and potentially lead to hot water heater explosions. The International Plumbing Code (IPC), Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC) and Standard Plumbing Code all require thermal expansion control to be addressed.

How a Diaphragm Thermal Expansion Tank Works

When water is heated in a closed system it expands. Water is not compressible; therefore, the additional water volume created has to go someplace. When an expansion tank is installed the excess water enters the pre-pressurized tank. As the temperature and pressure reaches its maximum, the diaphragm flexes against an air cushion (air is compressible) to allow for increased water expansion. When the system is opened again or the water cools, the water leaves the tank and returns to the system.

Note: Expansion tanks are always located on the cold water piping to the water heater or heating system.